8 Signs and Symptoms of Kidney Stones

What are kidney stones?

Kidney stones are hard collections of salt and minerals often made up of calcium or uric acid. They form inside the kidney and can travel to other parts of the urinary tract.

Stones vary in size. Some are as small as the period at the end of this sentence — a fraction of an inch. Others can grow to a few inches across. Some kidney stones can become so large they take up the entire kidney.

READ:   Renal cell carcinoma or Kidney cancer

A kidney stone forms when too much of certain minerals in your body accumulate in your urine. When you aren’t well hydrated, your urine becomes more concentrated with higher levels of certain minerals. When mineral levels are higher, it’s more likely that a kidney stone will form.

About 1 out of every 11 people in the United States will get a kidney stone. Stones are more common in men, people who are obese, and those who have diabetes

Smaller kidney stones that remain in the kidney often don’t cause any symptoms. You might not notice anything is amiss until the stone moves into your ureter — the tube that urine travels through to get from your kidney to your bladder.

READ:   Common symptoms of Urinary system diseases and disorders

Kidney stones are typically very painful. Most stones will pass on their own without treatment. However, you may need a procedure to break up or remove stones that don’t pass.

Here are eight signs and symptoms that you may have kidney stones.

1. Pain in the back, belly, or side

Kidney stone pain — also known as renal colic — is one of the most severe types of pain imaginable. Some people who’ve experienced kidney stones compare the pain to childbirth or getting stabbed with a knife.

The pain is intense enough to account for more than 1 million visits to emergency rooms each year.

Usually the pain starts when a stone moves into the narrow ureter. This causes a blockage, which makes pressure build up in the kidney.

READ:   Bladder cancer

The pressure activates nerve fibers that transmit pain signals to the brain.

Kidney stone pain often starts suddenly. As the stone moves, the pain changes location and intensity.

Pain often comes and goes in waves, which is made worse by the ureters contracting as they try to push the stone out. Each wave may last for a few minutes, disappear, and then come back again.

You’ll feel the pain along your side and back, below your ribs. It may radiate to your belly and groin area as the stone moves down through your urinary tract.

Large stones can be more painful than small ones, but the severity of pain doesn’t necessarily relate to the size of the stone. Even a little stone can be painful as it moves or causes a blockage.

Once the stone reaches the junction between the ureter and bladder, you’ll start to feel pain when you urinate. Your doctor might call this dysuria.

The pain can feel sharp or burning. If you don’t know you have a kidney stone, you might mistake it for a urinary tract infection. Sometimes you can have an infection along with the stone.

4. Blood in the urine

Blood in the urine is a common symptom in people with urinary tract stones. This symptom is also called hematuria.

The blood can be red, pink, or brown. Sometimes the blood cells are too small to see without a microscope (called microscopic hematuria), but your doctor can test for this symptom.

5. Cloudy or smelly urine

Healthy urine is clear and doesn’t have a strong odor. Cloudy or foul-smelling urine could be a sign of an infection in your kidneys or another part of your urinary tract.

One study found that about 8 percent of people with acute kidney stones had a urinary tract infection.

READ:   Hydronephrosis

Cloudiness is a sign of pus in the urine, or pyuria. The smell can come from the bacteria that cause urinary tract infections. An odor may also come from urine that’s more concentrated than normal.

6. Going a small amount at a time

Large kidney stones sometimes get stuck in a ureter. This blockage can slow or stop the flow of urine.

If you have a blockage, you may only urinate a little bit each time you go. Urine flow that stops entirely is a medical emergency.

8. Fever and chills

Fever and chills are signs that you have an infection in your kidney or another part of your urinary tract. This can be a serious complication to a kidney stone. It can also be a sign of other serious problems besides kidney stones. Any fever with pain requires urgent medical attention.

Fevers that occur with an infection are usually high — 100.4˚F (38˚C) or more. Chills or shivering often occur along with the fever.

The bottom line

Kidney stones are hard collections of salt and minerals that form in your kidneys and can travel to other parts of your urinary system.

READ:   End-stage renal disease

Stones cause symptoms like pain, trouble urinating, cloudy or smelly urine, nausea and vomiting.

Some stones will pass on their own. Others need treatment with sound waves or surgery to break them up or remove them.

Call your doctor if you have any symptoms of kidney stones. Get medical help right away if you have these symptoms, which could indicate that you have an infection or other serious complication:

  • pain so severe that you can’t get comfortable
  • nausea, vomiting, fever, or chills with the pain
  • blood in your urine
  • trouble urinating
Nephrotic syndrome ICD-9: 581.9 Description Nephrotic syndrome is a condition or a complex of signs and symptoms (syndrome) of the basement membrane of the glomerulus. (The basement membrane surrounds each of the many tiny capillaries comprising a glomerulus.) The disease is characterized by severe proteinuria, often to the extent that the body cannot keep up with the protein loss, which is known as hypoalbuminemia. The disease is further characterized by hyperlipemia (excessive levels of fatlike substances called lipids in the blood), lipiduria (lipids in the urine), and generalized edema. Etiology Nephrotic syndrome may result from a variety of disease processes having the capacity to damage the basement membrane of the glomerulus. Between 70% and 75% of the cases of nephrotic syndrome result from some form of glomerulonephritis. The syndrome also may arise as a consequence of diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, neoplasms, or reactions to drugs or toxins. The disease is occasio...
Can You Have Sex with a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? Can you have sex with a UTI? Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common. UTIs can develop anywhere in the urinary tract, from the urethra to the kidneys. Symptoms include: a persistent urge to urinate pain when urinating pelvic pain or tenderness Although these symptoms can be irritating, they won’t prevent you from having vaginal sex. That doesn’t mean you’ll feel up to it, though. A UTI can irritate the sensitive tissue in your urinary tract, and sexual activity can irritate those tissues even more. Sexual activity can also increase your risk of complications and potentially put your partner at risk. That’s why doctors usually recommend that you wait to have sex until you’re symptom-free and you’ve finished your entire treatment. It may cause pain and exacerbate other symptoms A UTI may irritate and inflame the sensitive tissues in your urinary tract. Any penetrative object — fingers, a toy, or a penis — can put pressure on the urinary organs during vagi...
End-stage renal disease ICD-9: 585.6 Description End-stage renal disease (ESRD), usually the result of chronic renal failure, is the gradual, progressive deterioration of kidney function to the point that the kidneys cannot sustain their necessary dayto-day life activity. As the kidney tissue is progressively destroyed, the kidney loses its ability to excrete the nitrogenous end products of metabolism, such as urea and creatinine, which accumulate in the blood and eventually reach toxic levels. As kidney function diminishes, every organ in the body is affected, and dialysis or kidney transplantation is eventually needed for survival. Etiology Causes of ESRD include diabetes mellitus (leading cause), hypertension, chronic glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis, obstruction of the urinary tract, congenital anomalies such as polycystic kidneys, vascular disorders, infections, medications, and toxic agents. Signs and Symptoms The early signs and symptoms are oliguria and azotemia, or the presence of n...
Urinary Tract Infection: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment What is a UTI? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection from microbes. These are organisms that are too small to be seen without a microscope. Most UTIs are caused by bacteria, but some are caused by fungi and in rare cases by viruses. UTIs are among the most common infections in humans. A UTI can happen anywhere in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Most UTIs only involve the urethra and bladder, in the lower tract. However, UTIs can involve the ureters and kidneys, in the upper tract. Although upper tract UTIs are more rare than lower tract UTIs, they’re also usually more severe. UTI symptoms Symptoms of a UTI depend on what part of the urinary tract is infected. Lower tract UTIs affect the urethra and bladder. Symptoms of a lower tract UTI include: burning with urination increased frequency of urination without passing much urine increased urgency of urination bloody urine cloudy urine ...
Common symptoms of Urinary system diseases and disorders Individuals may present with the following common complaints, which deserve attention from health-care professionals: Any change in normal urinary patterns, such as nocturia, hematuria, pyuria, proteinuria, dysuria, or urgency and frequency Pain in the lumbar region or flank pain, varying from slight tenderness to intense pain Fever Nausea and vomiting or anorexia Malaise, fatigue, and lethargy Serious urinary system diseases also may produce circulatory system and respiratory system symptoms. These symptoms might include hypertension, edema, ascites, and shortness of breath.