Adenoid hyperplasia

ICD-9: 474.12

Description

Adenoid hyperplasia is the enlargement of the lymphoid tissue of the nasopharynx, causing partial breathing blockage.

Etiology

The cause is essentially unknown. Circumstances that may cause the adenoids to continue to grow when they normally would atrophy (approximately ages 5 to 8) may include repeated infection and nasal congestion, chronic allergies, and heredity.

Signs and Symptoms

The most common symptoms are chronic mouthbreathing, snoring, and frequent head colds. The child’s speech has a nasal quality.

Diagnostic Procedures

Diagnosis is usually made by visualizing the hyperplastic adenoidal tissue or by the use of lateral pharyngeal x-ray films.

Treatment

The treatment of choice is adenoidectomy, often performed in conjunction with a tonsillectomy.

READ:   Pulmonary embolism

Complementary Therapy

No significant complementary therapy is indicated.

CLIENT COMMUNICATION

Explain in simple terms the surgical procedure to a child. Be sympathetic to both parents and child in preparation for surgery.

Prognosis

The prognosis is excellent with proper care and attention. If untreated, however, adenoid hyperplasia can lead to changes in facial features and complications such as otitis media, which carries an accompanying risk of hearing loss.

Prevention

There is no specific prevention for this adenoid hyperplasia.

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