Back pain Prevention

The majority of patients responding to basic extension and flexion principles of treatment have been educated in the means of achieving pain relief and restoring function. They have carried out the self-treatment procedures and have to a large extent become independent of therapists. Following successful treatment it requires little emphasis to convince patients that if they were able to reduce and abolish pain already present, it should also be possible to prevent the onset of any significant future low back pain.

Of all the factors predisposing to low back pain only postural stresses can be easily influenced and fully controlled. We must develop this potential ingredient of prophylaxis to the full. The patient must understand that the risks of incurring low back pain are particularly great when the lumbar spine is held in sustained flexed positions; and that when the lordosis is reduced or eliminated for prolonged periods, he must at regular intervals and before the onset of pain make a conscious effort to interrupt flexion, restore the lordosis and accentuate it momentarily to the maximum. It is essential that the patient knows the reasons for doing this, and therefore we must explain to him in lay terms that on restoring the lordosis the intradiscal pressure decreases, the nuclear fluid moves anteriorly and the posterior stresses in and around the disc are reduced.

READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 1 — LYING PRONE

Briefly summarised, the following prophylactic measures should always be taken:

  • Prolonged sitting requires (a) maintenance of the lordosis by muscular control of the posture or, preferably, by insertion of a lumbar roll, (b) hourly interruption of sitting by standing up, walking around for a few minutes and accentuating the lordosis by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • Activities involving prolonged stooping require (a) interruption of stooping at regular intervals by standing upright, (b) regularly reversing the curvature of the lumbar spine, restoring and accentuating the lordosis by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • Lifting requires (a) the use of the correct lifting technique. Generally, if the object to be lifted exceeds fifteen kilograms, the strain must be taken with the lumbar spine in lordosis and the lift must be performed using the legs. If the object to be lifted weighs under fifteen kilograms less care is necessary, unless one has been in a bent or sitting position for some time prior to the lift. In the latter case the same rules apply as for lifting weights exceeding fifteen kilograms, (b) accentuation of the lordosis before and after lifting by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • If inadvertently pain has developed during sitting, stooping or lifting, the patient should immediately commence extension in lying (Proc. 3).
  • Extension in standing (Proc. 6), very effective in preventing the onset of pain, is less effective when used to reduce present pain. Extension in lying (Proc. 3) is the technique of first aid for back pain.
  • Recurrence: At the first sign of recurrence the patient should immediately commence the procedures which previously led to recovery. Although an episode of low back pain can commence suddenly and without warning, many patients are aware of a minor degree of discomfort before the onset of severe pain. If this type of warning is given, the patient has an excellent chance to prevent the development of symptoms, provided the appropriate procedure is applied immediately.
READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 15 — FLEXION IN STEP STANDING

It is not possible for patients to remember all verbal instructions and advice given during the first treatment. To avoid tedious repetition and to ensure the necessary information is conveyed to the patient, a list of instructions is supplied on the first visit. This list firstly deals with information for patients in the acute stage of low back pain, and secondly provides information required once recovery has taken place. These instructions form an important part of self-treatment, because when followed properly they will help in reduction of present symptoms and prevention of their recurrence.

PAIN AND ITS TREATMENT MODELS Pain affects everyone at one time or another. Many diseases and disorders of the human body are accompanied by pain. It is feared by many people, as much as or more than the disease itself. What is pain? What purpose, if any, does it serve? What happens in the body when a person feels pain? How is pain assessed? What are the different types of pain? Can pain be treated? If so, how? These are some of the questions addressed in this chapter. Pain is an expanding science, and an increasing number of specialty clinics are emerging. The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) identifies the following four models for pain treatment: Single service clinics are normally outpatient clinics providing specific pain treatment with the goal to reduce pain. These do not provide comprehensive assessment or management. Examples include a nerve block clinic and a biofeedback clinic. Pain clinics also are outpatient, but their focus is mainly on diagnosis and management of indivi...
Recovering From Acute Low Back Pain. General Instructions You have recovered from the acute episode because of your ability to master the exercises which relieved your pain. These exercises must be repeated whenever situations arise which have previously caused pain. You must perform the corrective movements before the onset of pain. This is essential. If you carry out the following instruction, you can resume your normal activities without the fear of recurrence. SITTING When sitting for prolonged periods the maintenance of the lordosis is essential. It does not matter if you maintain this with your own muscles or with the help of a supportive roll, placed in the small of your back. In addition to sitting correctly with a lumbar support, you should interrupt prolonged sitting at regular intervals. On extended car journeys you should get out of the car every hour or two, stand upright, bend backwards five or six times, and walk around for a few minutes. BENDING FORWARDS When engaged in activities which require prolonged fo...
TYPICAL TREATMENT PROGRESSION — THE DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME Day one Assessment and conclusion/diagnosis. Explanation of the cause of dysfunction and the treatment approach. Postural correction and instructions, especially regarding sitting; demonstrate the use of a lumbar support. Commence with exercises to recover function — that is, extension in lying, flexion in lying, or side gliding in standing, whatever procedure is indicated. Emphasise the need to experience some discomfort during the exercises, and the importance of frequent exercising during the day. If flexion in lying is recommended, we must warn to stop exercising if the symptoms quickly worsen. We may have overlooked derangement, or commenced the procedure too early following recent derangement. Always follow flexion exercises with some extension. Day two Confirm diagnosis. Check postural correction. Completely repeat'postural correction and instructions. Check exercises. If improving nothing should be changed. If not improving, ensure tha...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 8 — EXTENSION MANIPULATION There are many techniques devised for manipulation of the lumbar spine in extension. It is not important which technique is used, provided the technique is performed on the properly selected patient and applied in the correct direction. The technique that I recommend is similar to the first two manipulations described by Cyriax for the reduction of a lumbar disc lesion. The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient and, having selected the affected segment, places the hands on either side of the spine as for the technique of extension mobilisation (procedure 7), which is always applied as a premanipulative testing procedure. If following testing the manipulation is indicated, the therapist leans over the patient with the arms at right angles to the spine and forces slowly downwards until the spine feels taut. Then a high velocity thrust of very short amplitude is applied and immediately released. Fig. Extension manipulation. The eff...
TYPICAL TREATMENT PROGRESSION — THE POSTURAL SYNDROME The days referred to in the treatment progression are related to treatment sessions which do not necessarily take place on consecutive days. This also applies for the treatment progressions of the dysfunction and derangement syndromes. Day one Assessment and conclusion/diagnosis. Postural discussion ensuring adequate explanation of the nature of the problem. The patient must understand the cause of pain. I usually give the simple example of pain arising from the passively bent forefinger. We must satisfy ourselves and the patient that the pain can be induced and abolished by positioning. If it is not possible to induce pain during the first treatment session, the patient must be instructed mow to abolish pain by postural correction when next it appears. Commence with postural correction exercises and give postural advice; do not try to teach too much the first visit. Discuss the importance of maintenance of the lordosis while sitting prolonged, and demonstrate the u...