Back pain Prevention

The majority of patients responding to basic extension and flexion principles of treatment have been educated in the means of achieving pain relief and restoring function. They have carried out the self-treatment procedures and have to a large extent become independent of therapists. Following successful treatment it requires little emphasis to convince patients that if they were able to reduce and abolish pain already present, it should also be possible to prevent the onset of any significant future low back pain.

Of all the factors predisposing to low back pain only postural stresses can be easily influenced and fully controlled. We must develop this potential ingredient of prophylaxis to the full. The patient must understand that the risks of incurring low back pain are particularly great when the lumbar spine is held in sustained flexed positions; and that when the lordosis is reduced or eliminated for prolonged periods, he must at regular intervals and before the onset of pain make a conscious effort to interrupt flexion, restore the lordosis and accentuate it momentarily to the maximum. It is essential that the patient knows the reasons for doing this, and therefore we must explain to him in lay terms that on restoring the lordosis the intradiscal pressure decreases, the nuclear fluid moves anteriorly and the posterior stresses in and around the disc are reduced.

READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 10 — ROTATION MANIPULATION IN EXTENSION

Briefly summarised, the following prophylactic measures should always be taken:

  • Prolonged sitting requires (a) maintenance of the lordosis by muscular control of the posture or, preferably, by insertion of a lumbar roll, (b) hourly interruption of sitting by standing up, walking around for a few minutes and accentuating the lordosis by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • Activities involving prolonged stooping require (a) interruption of stooping at regular intervals by standing upright, (b) regularly reversing the curvature of the lumbar spine, restoring and accentuating the lordosis by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • Lifting requires (a) the use of the correct lifting technique. Generally, if the object to be lifted exceeds fifteen kilograms, the strain must be taken with the lumbar spine in lordosis and the lift must be performed using the legs. If the object to be lifted weighs under fifteen kilograms less care is necessary, unless one has been in a bent or sitting position for some time prior to the lift. In the latter case the same rules apply as for lifting weights exceeding fifteen kilograms, (b) accentuation of the lordosis before and after lifting by a few repetitions of extension in standing (Proc. 6).
  • If inadvertently pain has developed during sitting, stooping or lifting, the patient should immediately commence extension in lying (Proc. 3).
  • Extension in standing (Proc. 6), very effective in preventing the onset of pain, is less effective when used to reduce present pain. Extension in lying (Proc. 3) is the technique of first aid for back pain.
  • Recurrence: At the first sign of recurrence the patient should immediately commence the procedures which previously led to recovery. Although an episode of low back pain can commence suddenly and without warning, many patients are aware of a minor degree of discomfort before the onset of severe pain. If this type of warning is given, the patient has an excellent chance to prevent the development of symptoms, provided the appropriate procedure is applied immediately.
READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 12 — ROTATION MANIPULATION IN FLEXION

It is not possible for patients to remember all verbal instructions and advice given during the first treatment. To avoid tedious repetition and to ensure the necessary information is conveyed to the patient, a list of instructions is supplied on the first visit. This list firstly deals with information for patients in the acute stage of low back pain, and secondly provides information required once recovery has taken place. These instructions form an important part of self-treatment, because when followed properly they will help in reduction of present symptoms and prevention of their recurrence.

Spine Health. PROCEDURE 15 — FLEXION IN STEP STANDING In this procedure the patient stands on one leg while the other leg rests with the foot on a stool so that hip and knee are about ninety degrees flexed. Keeping the weight bearing leg straight the patient draws himself into a flexed position, firmly approximating the shoulder and the already raised knee (both being on the same side). If possible the shoulder should be moved even lower than the knee. The patient may apply further pressure by pulling on the ankle of the raised foot. The pressure is then released and the patient returns to the upright position. The sequence is repeated about six to ten times. It is important that the patient returns to neutral standing and restores the lordosis in between each movement. Fig. Flexion in step standing. Effects: This procedure causes an asymmetrical flexion stress on the affected segments. It is applied when there is a deviation in flexion, which may occur in dysfunction as well as derangement. Both in dysfunction and derangement th...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 12 — ROTATION MANIPULATION IN FLEXION The sequence of procedure 11 must be followed completely to perform the required pre-manipulative testing. If the manipulation is indicated a sudden thrust of high velocity and small amplitude is performed, moving the spine into extreme side bending and rotation. Fig. Rotation manipulation in flexion. Effects: There are many techniques devised for rotation manipulation of the lumbar spine. When rotation of the lumbar spine is achieved by using the legs of the patient as a lever or fulcrum of movement, confusion arises as to the direction in which the lumbar spine rotates. This is judged by the movement of the upper vertebrae in relation to the lower — for example, if the patient is lying supine and the legs are taken to the right, then the lumbar spine rotates to the left. It has become widely accepted that rotation manipulation of the spine should be performed by rotation away from the painful side. This has applied to derangement as well as dysfunction, because hitherto n...
Lordosis: Causes, Treatments, and Risks What is lordosis? Everyone’s spine curves a little in your neck, upper back, and lower back. These curves, which create your spine’s S shape, are called the lordotic (neck and lower back) and kyphotic (upper back). They help your body: absorb shock support the weight of the head align your head over your pelvis stabilize and maintain its structure move and bend flexibly Lordosis refers to your natural lordotic curve, which is normal. But if your curve arches too far inward, it’s called lordosis, or swayback. Lordosis can affect your lower back and neck. This can lead to excess pressure on the spine, causing pain and discomfort. It can affect your ability to move if it’s severe and left untreated. Treatment of lordosis depends on how serious the curve is and how you got lordosis. There’s little medical concern if your lower back curve reverses itself when you bend forward. You can probably manage your condition with physical therapy and daily exercises. But yo...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 3 — EXTENSION IN LYING The patient, already lying prone, places the hands (palms down) near the shoulders as for the traditional press-up exercise. He now presses the top half of his body up by straightening the arms, while the bottom half, from the pelvis down is allowed to sag with gravity. The top half of the body is then lowered and the exercise is repeated about ten times. The first two or three movements should be carried out with some caution, but once these are found to be safe the remaining extension stresses may become successively stronger until the last movement is made to the maximum possible extension range. If the first series of exercises appears beneficial, then a second series may be indicated. More vigour can be applied and a better effect will be obtained if the last two or three extension stresses are sustained for a few seconds. It is essential to obtain the maximum elevation by the tenth excursion and once obtained the lumbar spine should be permitted to relax into the most extreme ...
Acute Low Back Pain. General Instructions You must retain the lordosis at all times (lordosis is the hollow in the lower back). Bending forwards as in touching the toes will only stretch and weaken the supporting structures of the back and lead to further injury. Losing the lordosis when sitting will also cause further strain. SITTING When in acute pain you should sit as little as possible, and then only for short periods only. At all times you must sit with a lordosis. Therefore you must place a supportive roll in the small of the back, especially when sitting in a car or lounge chair. If you have the choice you must sit on a firm, high chair with a straight back such as a kitchen chair. You should avoid sitting on a low, soft couch with a deep seat; this will force you to sit with hips lower than knees, and you will round the back and lose the lordosis. The legs must never be kept straight out in front as in sitting in bed, in the bath or on the floor; in this position you are forced to lose the lordosis. W...