Can You Have Sex with a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)?

Can you have sex with a UTI?

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common. UTIs can develop anywhere in the urinary tract, from the urethra to the kidneys. Symptoms include:

  • a persistent urge to urinate
  • pain when urinating
  • pelvic pain or tenderness

Although these symptoms can be irritating, they won’t prevent you from having vaginal sex. That doesn’t mean you’ll feel up to it, though. A UTI can irritate the sensitive tissue in your urinary tract, and sexual activity can irritate those tissues even more.

READ:   Urinary System: Facts, Functions & Diseases

Sexual activity can also increase your risk of complications and potentially put your partner at risk. That’s why doctors usually recommend that you wait to have sex until you’re symptom-free and you’ve finished your entire treatment.

It may cause pain and exacerbate other symptoms

A UTI may irritate and inflame the sensitive tissues in your urinary tract. Any penetrative object — fingers, a toy, or a penis — can put pressure on the urinary organs during vaginal intercourse. The urethral opening of a penis can be irritated from a UTI, too. These symptoms can lead to additional pain and discomfort during sex.

While vaginal sex may not be comfortable if you have a UTI, anal sex could be. If the mood strikes, talk with your partner about how you feel and whether this is something you’re both comfortable with.

READ:   8 Signs and Symptoms of Kidney Stones

Unless you use a dental dam, you shouldn’t receive oral sex while you have a UTI. This can help prevent the spread of any bacteria from the penis or vagina to the mouth. These bacteria could cause a secondary infection.

If you’re eager to engage in sexual activity before your infection is cleared up, work with your partner to find a style or position that is comfortable and enjoyable. If you continue to have pain despite your UTI treatment, make an appointment and follow up with your doctor.

It can introduce new bacteria

Sexual activity is one of the most common ways bacteria get into the urinary tract. Ninety percent of UTIs are the result of Escherichia coli bacteria that have found their way into the urethra and beyond.

READ:   Bladder cancer

E. coli bacteria are most often found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract or feces. These bacteria may move from the anus or GI tract onto you or your partner’s hands, mouth, genitals, or a sex toy.

Sex can also push bacteria further into your body through penetration, which sets up a higher likelihood of an infection. If you already have a UTI, penetration may reinfect you or introduce a new source of bacteria. This can lead to a longer recovery time.

You may pass the infection to your partner

A UTI isn’t a sexually transmitted infection (STI), and it isn’t considered a contagious condition. However, you can pass the bacteria that causes a UTI between partners.

READ:   Urinary Tract Infection: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

For example, E. coli bacteria may travel from your anus to the vaginal opening or onto a penis. During vaginal sex, a penis can move the bacteria into the vaginal opening, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

In some cases, the UTI may actually be a side effect of an STI, such as chlamydia or trichomoniasis. These infections can be passed between partners.

If you do decide to have sex

If you decide you want to engage in sexual activity despite your UTI, there are a number of tips to keep in mind.

Heed your symptoms

If you have the sudden urge to pee, take a break. Holding urine in when you have to pee may increase your risk for another UTI or complicate your symptoms.

READ:   Acute Tubular Necrosis

Pee before and after sex

It may seem tedious and less than romantic, but you should head for the loo as soon as the deed is done. This way, you can flush out any bacteria that may have found their way into your urethra.

Wash after sex

It isn’t uncommon for bacteria from around the anus to travel closer to your urethral opening during penetrative sex. This is especially true if anal sex is involved. Washing after intercourse can help remove these bacteria.

Don’t swap orifices

Reduce your risk of spreading bacteria by not moving from vagina to anus, or vice versa. Also, avoid oral sex to prevent a secondary infection.

READ:   Glomerulonephritis (Acute)

Talk with your doctor

If you have questions about what’s safe to do while you’re treating a UTI, talk with your doctor or a nurse. Your doctor should also let you know if the medication they’re prescribing will interfere with any other medications you take, such as oral contraceptives.

When to see your doctor

If you’re still unsure whether it’s safe to engage in sexual activity with a UTI, talk with your doctor.

You should also talk with your doctor if you experience any new symptoms, such as:

  • bleeding during urination
  • severe back or abdominal pain
  • unusual discharge from the penis or vagina

If your symptoms remain after you’ve finished taking your antibiotics, you should schedule a follow-up appointment with your doctor. Your symptoms may be the result of another condition or a secondary infection.

READ:   Polycystic Kidney disease
Urinary System: Facts, Functions & Diseases The urinary system, also known as the renal system, produces, stores and eliminates urine, the fluid waste excreted by the kidneys. The kidneys make urine by filtering wastes and extra water from blood. Urine travels from the kidneys through two thin tubes called ureters and fills the bladder. When the bladder is full, a person urinates through the urethra to eliminate the waste. The urinary system is susceptible to a variety of infections and other problems, including blockages and injuries. These can be treated by a urologist or another health care professional who specializes in the renal system. Description of the urinary system The urinary system works with the lungs, skin and intestines to maintain the balance of chemicals and water in the body. Adults eliminate about 27 to 68 fluid ounces (800 to 2,000 milliliters) per day based on typical daily fluid intake of 68 ounces (2 liters), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Other factors in urinary system function include fluid ...
Hydronephrosis ICD-9: 591 Description Hydronephrosis is the distention of the renal pelvis and calyces of a kidney due to pressure from accumulating urine. The pressure impairs, and may eventually interrupt, kidney function. One or both kidneys may be affected. Etiology Hydronephrosis is caused by a urinary tract obstruction. The ureters and renal pelvis dilate proximal to, or behind, the obstruction. This swelling causes the hydronephrosis with resultant destruction of functional tissue. In children, the obstruction is usually the result of some congenital defect in urinary tract structure. In adults, the obstruction is more often acquired, resulting from blockage by neoplasms or uroliths, commonly called kidney stones or renal calculi. Urinary tract obstruction in men may be produced by benign or malignant enlargement of the prostate. Women may experience urinary tract obstruction as a complication of pregnancy. Underlying disorders such as neurogenic bladder also may allow urine to acc...
Urinary Tract Infection: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment What is a UTI? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection from microbes. These are organisms that are too small to be seen without a microscope. Most UTIs are caused by bacteria, but some are caused by fungi and in rare cases by viruses. UTIs are among the most common infections in humans. A UTI can happen anywhere in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract is made up of your kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. Most UTIs only involve the urethra and bladder, in the lower tract. However, UTIs can involve the ureters and kidneys, in the upper tract. Although upper tract UTIs are more rare than lower tract UTIs, they’re also usually more severe. UTI symptoms Symptoms of a UTI depend on what part of the urinary tract is infected. Lower tract UTIs affect the urethra and bladder. Symptoms of a lower tract UTI include: burning with urination increased frequency of urination without passing much urine increased urgency of urination bloody urine cloudy urine ...
Kidney Stones What are kidney stones? Kidney stones, or renal calculi, are solid masses made of crystals. Kidney stones usually originate in your kidneys. However, they can develop anywhere along your urinary tract, which consists of these parts: kidneys ureters bladder urethra Kidney stones are one of the most painful medical conditions. The causes of kidney stones vary according to the type of stone. Types of kidney stones Not all kidney stones are made up of the same crystals. The different types of kidney stones include: Calcium Calcium stones are the most common. They’re often made of calcium oxalate (though they can consist of calcium phosphate or maleate). Eating fewer oxalate-rich foods can reduce your risk of developing this type of stone. High-oxalate foods include: potato chips peanuts chocolate beets spinach However, even though some kidney stones are made of calcium, getting enough calcium in your diet can prevent stones from forming. U...
Glomerulonephritis (Acute) ICD-9: 580.9 Description Glomerulonephritis, which is inflammation of the glomeruli in the kidney’s nephrons, causes the rate of blood filtration to be reduced. Retention of water and salts follows, resulting in injury to the glomeruli, which allow RBCs and serum protein to pass into the urine. Both kidneys are affected. Etiology The cause is often unknown. However, it is also known as acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), following a streptococcal infection of the respiratory tract. This inflammation is a consequence of an infection elsewhere in the body, most frequently following an infection of the upper respiratory tract or the middle ear by streptococcal bacteria. APSGN is less common today owing to the antibiotic therapy used for streptococcal infections. Other bacteria, however, and certain viruses and parasites, such as impetigo, mumps, Epstein-Barr virus, and hepatitis B and C as well as HIV (AIDS), also may induce glomerulonephritis. The disease also...