Common symptoms of eye diseases and disorders

Common symptoms of eye diseases and disorders

Individuals may present with the following common symptoms, which deserve attention from healthcare professionals:

  • Any visual disturbance or change in vision
  • Pain or burning in the eye and any of its structures
  • Eye redness
  • Photophobia
READ:   Keratitis
Glaucoma ICD-9: 365.xx Description Glaucoma is a condition in which accumulating fluid pressure within the eye damages the retina and optic nerve, often causing blindness. The buildup of pressure occurs because more fluid, called aqueous humor, is produced than can be drained from the eye. The most common form of this condition, called open-angle glaucoma, results from obstruction of passages within the eye that form the trabecular meshwork, which drains the aqueous humor into the lymphatic system. In the United States, glaucoma affects 2% of the population older than age 40. The condition may be unilateral or bilateral. Etiology Primary forms of the condition, such as open-angle glaucoma, are idiopathic; however, a strong familial tendency toward developing this condition suggests that unknown genetic factors may be involved. Glaucoma also may arise secondary to a wide variety of other diseases, or it may be induced by certain drugs or toxins. Glaucoma most often occurs in adults o...
Otitis media ICD-9: 382.9 Description Otitis media is an accumulation of fluid within the structure of the middle ear. The condition is subclassified into either serous or suppurative according to the composition of the accumulating fluid. In serous otitis media, the fluid is comparatively clear and sterile, secreted from the membranes lining the inner ear. In suppurative otitis media, the fluid is the product of pus-producing bacteria. The pressure from the accumulating fluid, in either form of the condition, may be sufficient to occasion temporary hearing loss. Both serous and suppurative forms of the disease may occur as acute or chronic conditions. Otitis media is most common among children. Etiology Acute serous otitis media may occur spontaneously or following an upper respiratory tract infection. It also may be occasioned by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure, such as occur during flying or diving, or by allergic reactions. The chronic form of serous otitis media may develop f...
Uveitis ICD-9: 364.xx Description Uveitis is inflammation of the uveal tract, which is the principal vascular connective tissue component of the eye (iris, ciliary body, choroid). The condition is usually unilateral. The iris, ciliary body, or choroid may be affected separately or in combination. It may occur in the anterior or posterior portion of the tract. Etiology Uveitis may be associated with autoimmune disorders, or it may be idiopathic. Uveitis may be caused by microbial infections or debilitating diseases, such as AIDS, tuberculosis, herpes zoster infection, and histoplasmosis, or it may result from improperly healed corneal abrasions. Allergies, chemicals, trauma, or surgery may also be the cause. Signs and Symptoms Symptoms include pain; intense, unusual intolerance of light (photophobia); blurred vision; redness; and dark, floating spots in the vision. The primary care provider may note severe ciliary congestion, tearing, and a pupil that is nonreactive when exp...
Eye and ear anatomy and physiology review Our most important sensory receptors are the eyes and the ears. The eye is the primary organ for sight, and the ear is the primary organ for sound and equilibrium. Obviously, any impairment of either of these sensory receptors can be a traumatic experience and can cause serious disability. Eyes The eyes contain the receptors for light stimuli and are the organs of vision. The eyes are protected within the eye orbits by surrounding bones, the eyelids, the eyelashes, the eyebrows, and the conjunctiva, or inner mucous membrane surface of the eyelids. The meibomian glands on the inner surface of the upper and lower eyelids produce lipidlike secretions to help keep the eye moist. When the eye blinks, the upper lid presses on the oil, pulling a sheet of oil upwards to coat the tear layer and keep it from evaporating. The lacrimal apparatus produces and removes tears. Tears help to keep the outer part of the eye and the conjunctiva moist. The eye is a hollow, spherical organ composed of thr...
Retinal detachment ICD-9: 361.xx Description Retinal detachment is the complete or partial separation of the retina from the choroid layer of the eye; it leads to the loss of retinal function and blindness. The condition occurs as a result of a hole or break in the retina that allows fluid, the vitreous humor, to accumulate between the two layers. FIGURE. Retinal detachment. (From Venes, D, and Thomas, CL : Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, ed 21. FA Davis, Philadelphia, 2009, p 2025, with permission.) Etiology Retinal detachment usually is caused by head trauma. Hemorrhages or tumors of the outer (choroid) layer also may cause the condition. Certain systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus may predispose to the condition. Spontaneous retinal detachments also may occur among elderly persons, those who are very nearsighted, or those who have a family history of retinal detachment. Signs and Symptoms An individual with retinal detachment may report seeing cobwebs, floating spot...