Spine Health. PROCEDURE 13 — FLEXION IN LYING

The patient lies supine with the knees and hips flexed to about forty-five degrees and the feet flat on the couch. He bends the knees up towards the chest, firmly clasps the hands about them and applies overpressure to achieve maximum stress. The knees are then released and the feet placed back on the couch. The sequence is repeated about ten times. The first two or three flexion stresses are applied cautiously, but when the procedure is found to be safe the remaining pressures may become successively stronger, the last two or three being applied to the maximum possible.

Fig. Flexion in lying.

Effects:

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Flexion in lying causes a stretching of the posterior wall of the annulus, the posterior longitudinal ligament, the capsules of the facet joints, and other soft tissues. As the movement takes place from below upwards the lower lumbar and lumbo-sacral joints are placed on full stretch at the beginning of the exercise as soon as movement is initiated. Thus, the procedure is very important in flexion dysfunction when shortening of posterior soft tissues has occurred.

The procedure should always be performed following stabilisation of a reduced posterior derangement. This ensures that no flexion loss remains after the patient has become symptom free. By keeping the patient in extension and avoiding flexion as healing takes place, we permit scar formation with the joints in a shortened position. This shortened position will be held by the scar as it contracts, the patient remaining painfree but unable to flex. Any attempts to perform flexion beyond the limits imposed by the contracting scar, will produce pain. Therefore, further flexion will be avoided and adaptive shortening gradually worsens.

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Flexion in lying performed regularly following reduction of posterior derangement allows the formation of an extensible scar in the midst of an elastic structure. Should we permit an inextensible scar to remain in the midst of an elastic structure, — the disc in this case — then sooner or later the patient will inadvertently move beyond the limitations of the scar, which results in further tearing of soft tissues and apparent recurrence of the derangement condition. This basic complication of healing exists throughout the muscular as well as the articular systems.

Flexion in lying also causes a posterior movement of the fluid nucleus and will be utilised in anterior derangement situations (Derangement seven) to reverse the excessive anterior position of the nucleus.

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Back pain. Predisposing and Precipitating Factors PREDISPOSING FACTORS Sitting posture There are three predisposing factors in the etiology of low back pain that overshadow most others. The first and most important factor is the sitting posture. A good sitting posture maintains the spinal curves normally present in the erect standing position. Postures which reduce or accentuate the normal curves enough to place the ligamentous structures under full stretch will eventually be productive of pain. Such postures are referred to as poor sitting postures. A poor sitting posture may produce back pain in itself without any additional other strains of living. We have all seen patients who entered an airliner, a car, or even a common lounge chair in a perfectly healthy and painfree state only to emerge hours later crippled with pain and unable to walk upright. Alternatively, a poor sitting posture will frequently enhance and always perpetuate the problems in patients suffering from low back pain. By far the great majority of patients comp...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 9 — ROTATION MOBILISATION IN EXTENSION The position of patient and therapist is the same as for procedure 7. By modifying the technique of extension mobilisation so that the pressure is applied first to the transverse process on the one side and then on the other side of the appropriate segment a rocking effect is obtained. Each time the vertebra is rotated away from the side to which the pressure is applied — for example, pressure on the right transverse process of the fourth lumbar vertebra causes left rotation of the same vertebra. The technique should be repeated about ten times on the involved segment and, if indicated, adjacent segments should be treated as well. Fig. Rotation mobilisation in extension. Effects: Also here the external force applied by the therapist enhances the effects on derangement and dysfunction as described for the previous extension procedures. The reasons for adding therapist-technique are the same as for procedure 7. In general, unilateral techniques are likely to effect unilateral...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 14 — FLEXION IN STANDING The simple toe touching exercise in standing does not need much elaboration. The patient, standing with the feet about thirty centimeters apart, bends forward sliding the hands down the front of the legs in order to have some support and to measure the degree of flexion achieved. On reaching the maximum flexion allowed by pain or range, the patient returns to the upright position. The sequence is repeated about ten times, should be performed rhythmically, and initially with caution and without vigour. It is important to ensure that in between each movement the patient returns to neutral standing. Fig. Flexion in standing. Effects: Flexion in standing differs from flexion in lying in various ways. Naturally, the gravitational and compressive forces act differently in both situations. In flexion in standing the movement takes place from above downwards, and the lower lumbar and lumbo-sacral joints are placed on full stretch only at the end of the movement. In addition, the lumbo...
Lordosis: Causes, Treatments, and Risks What is lordosis? Everyone’s spine curves a little in your neck, upper back, and lower back. These curves, which create your spine’s S shape, are called the lordotic (neck and lower back) and kyphotic (upper back). They help your body: absorb shock support the weight of the head align your head over your pelvis stabilize and maintain its structure move and bend flexibly Lordosis refers to your natural lordotic curve, which is normal. But if your curve arches too far inward, it’s called lordosis, or swayback. Lordosis can affect your lower back and neck. This can lead to excess pressure on the spine, causing pain and discomfort. It can affect your ability to move if it’s severe and left untreated. Treatment of lordosis depends on how serious the curve is and how you got lordosis. There’s little medical concern if your lower back curve reverses itself when you bend forward. You can probably manage your condition with physical therapy and daily exercises. But yo...
TREATMENT OF EXTENSION DYSFUNCTION By far the most common form of ⚡ dysfunction ⚡ is that involving loss of extension. Having already explained and taught the postural requirements, we must now instruct the patient in the methods required to regain lost extension. We must explain to him the reasons for the need to recover the extension movement. The patient must realise that without an adequate range of extension it is not possible to sit with a lordosis, even when a lumbar support is used. For some patients it is imperative that the range of extension be improved, otherwise they will be unable to sit correctly. It is my experience that, following adequate explanation, patients will co-operate with the treatment and work hard at their recovery. They will perform exercises that cause discomfort or even pain, as long as they understand the reasons for doing so. Fig. Recovery of loss of extension, using the procedure of extension in lying. Exercises In order to systematically stretch the lumbar spine in extension, I...