Spine Health. PROCEDURE 6 — EXTENSION IN STANDING

The patient stands with the feet well apart and places the hands (fingers pointing backwards) in the small of the back across the belt line. He leans backwards as far as possible, using the hands as a fulcrum, and then returns to neutral standing. The exercise is repeated about ten times. As with extension in lying it is necessary to move to the very maximum to obtain the desired result.

Fig. Extension in standing.

Effects:

Extension in standing produces similar effects on derangement and dysfunction as extension in lying, but it is less effective in the earlier treatment stages of both syndromes. Whenever extension in lying is prevented by circumstances, an extension stress can be given by extension in standing.

READ:   The Dysfunction Syndrome

In derangement, extension in standing is designed to reduce accumulation of nuclear material in the posterior compartment of the intervertebral joint, provided this accumulation is not gross. In the latter case extension in lying will have to be performed first. The procedure is very important in the prevention of the onset of tow back pain during or after prolonged sitting or activities involving prolonged stooping, and is very effective when performed before pain is actually felt.

WHAT IS PAIN? Definition of Pain In dictionaries, pain (ICD-9: 780.96) is defined as a sensation of hurting or of strong discomfort in some part of the body, caused by an injury, a disease, or a functional disorder and transmitted through the nervous system. A nurse, Margo McCaffery, who worked for years with clients in pain and conducted extensive research in the field of pain, defines pain as whatever the experiencing person says it is, existing when he or she says it does. This definition is perhaps the most useful because it acknowledges the client’s complaint, recognizes the subjective nature of pain, and implicitly suggests that diverse measures may be undertaken to relieve pain. The IASP and the American Pain Society (APS) define pain as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience arising from actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage. Again, this definition further confirms the multiple components of pain in a person’s psychological and physiological exist...
The Postural Syndrome DEFINITION I would define the postural syndrome as mechanical deformation of postural origin causing pain of a strictly intermittent nature, which appears when the soft tissues surrounding the lumbar segments are placed under prolonged stress. This occurs when a person performs activities which keep the lumbar spine in a relatively static position (as in vacuuming, gardening) or when they maintain end positions for any length of time (as in prolonged sitting). History Patients with postural pain are usually aged thirty or under. Frequently they have a sedentary occupation and in general they lack physical fitness. In addition to low back pain they often describe pains in the mid-thoracic and cervical areas. They state that the pain is produced by positions and not by movement, is intermittent and may sometimes disappear for two to three days at a time. It is often found that, when patients are more active at weekends — playing tennis and dancing — they have relatively little or no t...
Hyperlordosis: Treatment, Prevention, and More What’s hyperlordosis? Human spines are naturally curved, but too much curve can cause problems. Hyperlordosis is when the inward curve of the spine in your lower back is exaggerated. This condition is also called swayback or saddleback. Hyperlordosis can occur in all ages, but it’s rare in children. It’s a reversible condition. Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of hyperlordosis and how it’s treated. What are the symptoms of hyperlordosis? If you have hyperlordosis, the exaggerated curve of your spine will cause your stomach to thrust forward and your bottom to push out. From the side, the inward curve of your spine will look arched, like the letter C. You can see the arched C if you look at your profile in a full-length mirror. You may have lower back pain or neck pain, or restricted movement. There’s limited evidence connecting hyperlordosis to lower back pain, however. Most hyperlordosis is mild, and your back remains flexible. If the arch in your bac...
Back pain. The Cause of Pain THE NOCICEPTIVE RECEPTOR SYSTEM Most tissues in the body possess a system of nerve endings which, being particularly sensitive to tissue dysfunction, may be referred to as nociceptive receptors. The free nerve endings of the nociceptive system provide the means by which we are made aware of pain. Wyke describes the distribution of the nociceptive receptor system in the lumbar area: it is found in the skin and subcutaneous tissue; throughout the fibrous capsule of all the synovial apophyseal joints and sacro-iliac joints; in the longitudinal ligaments, the fiaval and interspinous ligaments and sacro-iliac ligaments; in the periosteum covering the vertebral bodies and arches, and in the fascia, aponeuroses and tendons attached thereto; and also in the spinal dura mater, including the dural sleeves surrounding the nerve roots. The nociceptive innervation of the spinal ligaments varies from one ligament to another. The system is found to be most dense in the posterior longitudinal l...
The Derangement Syndrome Of all mechanical low back problems that are encountered in general medical practise, mechanical derangement of the intervertebral disc is potentially the most disabling. It is my belief that in the lumbar spine, if in no other area, disturbance of the intervertebral disc mechanism is responsible for the production of symptoms in as many as ninety-five percent of our patients. Twenty-five years of clinical observation and treatment of lumbar conditions have convinced me that certain phenomena and the various movements which affect them, can occur only because of the hydrostatic properties invested in the intervertebral disc. For thirty years Cyriax has attributed lumbar pain to internal derangement of the intervertebral disc mechanism. He has outlined the cause of lumbago, and proposed that pain of a slow onset is likely to be produced by a nuclear protrusion while that of a sudden onset is caused by a displaced annular fragment. Although at present we are unable to prove either of ...