Spine Health. PROCEDURE 7 — EXTENSION MOBILISATION

The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient, crosses the arms and places the heels of the hands on the transverse processes of the appropriate lumbar segment. A gentle pressure is applied symmetrically and immediately released, but the hands must not lose contact. This is repeated rhythmically to the same segment about ten times. Each pressure is a little stronger than the previous one, depending on the patient’s tolerance and the behaviour of the pain. The procedure should be applied to the adjacent segments, one at a time, until all the areas affected have been mobilised.

READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 11 — SUSTAINED ROTATION/MOBILISATION IN FLEXION

Fig. Positioning of hands prior to extension mobilisation. Extension mobilisation.

Effects:

In this procedure the external force applied by the therapist enhances the effects on derangement and dysfunction as described for the previous extension procedures.

In general, symmetrical pressures are used on patients with central and bilateral symptoms. Therapist-technique must be added when the patient is unable to reduce derangement or resolve dysfunction by the self-treatment procedures. That situation appears in derangement when instead of progressively lessening pain extension in lying (procedure 3) causes the same pain with each repetition. Under those circumstances extension mobilisation is indicated.

Low Back Pain. Contraindications Although it has been accepted throughout that all patients have received adequate medical screening, occasionally patients with serious pathology or mechanical disorders unsuited to mechanical treatment are encountered during routine examination. If in the examination no position or movement can be found which reduces the presenting pain, the patient is unsuited for mechanical therapy, at least at this time. The existence of serious pathology should be considered when the history states that there has been no apparent reason for the onset of symptoms; that the symptoms have been present for many weeks or months, and have during that time increased in intensity; and that they are constant; and the patient feels that he is gradually getting worse. On examination the pain remains exactly the same, irrespective of positions assumed or movements performed. Usually there is little loss of function if any, and postural deformity is not often seen. In addition to the examination finding, th...
TREATMENT OF SIDE GLIDING DYSFUNCTION — CORRECTION OF SECONDARY LATERAL SHIFT Having observed thousands of lumbar spines it has become clear to me that asymmetry is the ‘norm’ and symmetry is almost atypical. Therefore, when examining dysfunction patients it is important to realise that many exhibit a minor scoliosis or lateral shift, the direction of which is sometimes extremely difficult to determine. With careful observation it can be seen that the top half of the patient’s body is not correctly related to the bottom half, and the patient has shifted laterally about the lumbar area. The anomalies include a number of lateral shifts now dysfunctional in character. These lateral shifts are referred to as secondary whereas those caused by derangement are primary. Fig. Recovery of loss of side gliding, leaching the procedure of self-correction of secondary lateral shift. As discussed previously, we must determine whether the lateral shift is relevant to the present symptoms or is merely a congenital or developmental anomaly. If side gliding produces pain the...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 1 — LYING PRONE The patient adopts the prone lying position with the arms alongside the trunk and the head turned to one side. In this position the lumbar spine falls automatically into some degree of lordosis. Fig. Lying prone. Effects In derangement with some degree of posterior displacement of the nuclear content of the disc the adoption of procedure 1 may cause, or contribute to, the reduction of the derangement provided enough time is allowed for the fluid nucleus to alter its position anteriorly. A period of five to ten minutes of relaxed prone lying is usually sufficient. This procedure is essential and the first step to be taken in the treatment and self-treatment of derangement. In patients with a major derangement, such as those presenting with an acute lumbar kyphosis, the natural lordosis of prone lying is unobtainable. These patients cannot tolerate the prone position unless they are lying over a few pillows, supporting their deformity in kyphosis. In minor derangement situat...
TYPICAL TREATMENT PROGRESSION — THE POSTURAL SYNDROME The days referred to in the treatment progression are related to treatment sessions which do not necessarily take place on consecutive days. This also applies for the treatment progressions of the dysfunction and derangement syndromes. Day one Assessment and conclusion/diagnosis. Postural discussion ensuring adequate explanation of the nature of the problem. The patient must understand the cause of pain. I usually give the simple example of pain arising from the passively bent forefinger. We must satisfy ourselves and the patient that the pain can be induced and abolished by positioning. If it is not possible to induce pain during the first treatment session, the patient must be instructed mow to abolish pain by postural correction when next it appears. Commence with postural correction exercises and give postural advice; do not try to teach too much the first visit. Discuss the importance of maintenance of the lordosis while sitting prolonged, and demonstrate the u...
Back pain. The Cause of Pain THE NOCICEPTIVE RECEPTOR SYSTEM Most tissues in the body possess a system of nerve endings which, being particularly sensitive to tissue dysfunction, may be referred to as nociceptive receptors. The free nerve endings of the nociceptive system provide the means by which we are made aware of pain. Wyke describes the distribution of the nociceptive receptor system in the lumbar area: it is found in the skin and subcutaneous tissue; throughout the fibrous capsule of all the synovial apophyseal joints and sacro-iliac joints; in the longitudinal ligaments, the fiaval and interspinous ligaments and sacro-iliac ligaments; in the periosteum covering the vertebral bodies and arches, and in the fascia, aponeuroses and tendons attached thereto; and also in the spinal dura mater, including the dural sleeves surrounding the nerve roots. The nociceptive innervation of the spinal ligaments varies from one ligament to another. The system is found to be most dense in the posterior longitudinal l...