Spine Health. PROCEDURE 7 — EXTENSION MOBILISATION

The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient, crosses the arms and places the heels of the hands on the transverse processes of the appropriate lumbar segment. A gentle pressure is applied symmetrically and immediately released, but the hands must not lose contact. This is repeated rhythmically to the same segment about ten times. Each pressure is a little stronger than the previous one, depending on the patient’s tolerance and the behaviour of the pain. The procedure should be applied to the adjacent segments, one at a time, until all the areas affected have been mobilised.

READ:   TREATMENT OF THE POSTURAL SYNDROME

Fig. Positioning of hands prior to extension mobilisation. Extension mobilisation.

Effects:

In this procedure the external force applied by the therapist enhances the effects on derangement and dysfunction as described for the previous extension procedures.

In general, symmetrical pressures are used on patients with central and bilateral symptoms. Therapist-technique must be added when the patient is unable to reduce derangement or resolve dysfunction by the self-treatment procedures. That situation appears in derangement when instead of progressively lessening pain extension in lying (procedure 3) causes the same pain with each repetition. Under those circumstances extension mobilisation is indicated.

Hyperlordosis: Treatment, Prevention, and More What’s hyperlordosis? Human spines are naturally curved, but too much curve can cause problems. Hyperlordosis is when the inward curve of the spine in your lower back is exaggerated. This condition is also called swayback or saddleback. Hyperlordosis can occur in all ages, but it’s rare in children. It’s a reversible condition. Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of hyperlordosis and how it’s treated. What are the symptoms of hyperlordosis? If you have hyperlordosis, the exaggerated curve of your spine will cause your stomach to thrust forward and your bottom to push out. From the side, the inward curve of your spine will look arched, like the letter C. You can see the arched C if you look at your profile in a full-length mirror. You may have lower back pain or neck pain, or restricted movement. There’s limited evidence connecting hyperlordosis to lower back pain, however. Most hyperlordosis is mild, and your back remains flexible. If the arch in your bac...
TREATMENT OF SIDE GLIDING DYSFUNCTION — CORRECTION OF SECONDARY LATERAL SHIFT Having observed thousands of lumbar spines it has become clear to me that asymmetry is the ‘norm’ and symmetry is almost atypical. Therefore, when examining dysfunction patients it is important to realise that many exhibit a minor scoliosis or lateral shift, the direction of which is sometimes extremely difficult to determine. With careful observation it can be seen that the top half of the patient’s body is not correctly related to the bottom half, and the patient has shifted laterally about the lumbar area. The anomalies include a number of lateral shifts now dysfunctional in character. These lateral shifts are referred to as secondary whereas those caused by derangement are primary. Fig. Recovery of loss of side gliding, leaching the procedure of self-correction of secondary lateral shift. As discussed previously, we must determine whether the lateral shift is relevant to the present symptoms or is merely a congenital or developmental anomaly. If side gliding produces pain the...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 16 — CORRECTION OF LATERAL SHIFT This procedure has two parts: first the deformity in scoliosis is corrected; then, if present, the deformity in kyphosis is reduced and full extension is restored. The patient, standing with the feet about thirty centimeters apart, is asked to clearly define the areas where pain is being felt at present. The therapist stands on the side to which the patient is deviating and places the patient’s near elbow at a right angle by his side. The elbow will be used to increase the lateral pressure against the patient’s rib cage. The therapist’s arms encircle the patient’s trunk, clasping the hands about the rim of the pelvis. Now the therapist presses his shoulder against the patient’s elbow, pushing the patient’s rib cage, thoracic and upper lumbar spine away while at the same time drawing the patient’s pelvis towards himself. In this manner the deformity in scoliosis is reduced and, if possible slightly overcorrected. Initially, there will be significant resistance to the procedure, wh...
TREATMENT OF EXTENSION DYSFUNCTION By far the most common form of ⚡ dysfunction ⚡ is that involving loss of extension. Having already explained and taught the postural requirements, we must now instruct the patient in the methods required to regain lost extension. We must explain to him the reasons for the need to recover the extension movement. The patient must realise that without an adequate range of extension it is not possible to sit with a lordosis, even when a lumbar support is used. For some patients it is imperative that the range of extension be improved, otherwise they will be unable to sit correctly. It is my experience that, following adequate explanation, patients will co-operate with the treatment and work hard at their recovery. They will perform exercises that cause discomfort or even pain, as long as they understand the reasons for doing so. Fig. Recovery of loss of extension, using the procedure of extension in lying. Exercises In order to systematically stretch the lumbar spine in extension, I...
TREATMENT OF PAIN The objective of pain treatment is to remove or correct the cause of pain or to lessen the severity of the pain; however, there can be a lag in time between identifying the cause of the pain and providing relief. The treatment of pain is diverse and can be difficult. A multidisciplinary approach to chronic pain management is often most successful but is not always available to everyone. This team approach involves both medical and nonmedical personnel and may include any of a number of approaches. There also are a number of integrative/complementary pain control protocols that may be effective. Treatment of pain depends on the type of pain. Medications, also, are different in their pain control management. Medications Medications tend to be the treatment of choice for many clients experiencing pain. Analgesics, anesthetics, and anti-inflammatory agents may be prescribed to decrease or eliminate pain, although they do not eliminate the cause of pain. Analgesics can be opioid (formerly...