Spine Health. PROCEDURE 7 — EXTENSION MOBILISATION

The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient, crosses the arms and places the heels of the hands on the transverse processes of the appropriate lumbar segment. A gentle pressure is applied symmetrically and immediately released, but the hands must not lose contact. This is repeated rhythmically to the same segment about ten times. Each pressure is a little stronger than the previous one, depending on the patient’s tolerance and the behaviour of the pain. The procedure should be applied to the adjacent segments, one at a time, until all the areas affected have been mobilised.

READ:   Back Pain History

Fig. Positioning of hands prior to extension mobilisation. Extension mobilisation.

Effects:

In this procedure the external force applied by the therapist enhances the effects on derangement and dysfunction as described for the previous extension procedures.

In general, symmetrical pressures are used on patients with central and bilateral symptoms. Therapist-technique must be added when the patient is unable to reduce derangement or resolve dysfunction by the self-treatment procedures. That situation appears in derangement when instead of progressively lessening pain extension in lying (procedure 3) causes the same pain with each repetition. Under those circumstances extension mobilisation is indicated.

The Dysfunction Syndrome The word ‘dysfunction’ chosen by Mennell to describe the loss of movement commonly known as ‘joint play’ or ‘accessory movement’ seems infinitely preferable to the terms ‘osteopathic lesion’ and ‘chiropractic subluxation’, neither of which means anything and both of which mean everything. ‘Dysfunction’ or ‘not functioning correctly’ at least acknowledges that something is wrong without going through the sham procedure of pretending that only those who belong to the club really understand the terminology. For years osteopaths and chiropractors have claimed that only the people, properly trained in their particular calling, have the necessary knowledge to understand their terminology. There may be some truth in that. Although I believe that the term ‘dysfunction’ as used by Mennel does not strictly cover the loss of movement caused by adaptive shortening, I have chosen to use this term instead of repeatedly referring to ‘adaptive shortening’. Essentially, the mechanism of pain prod...
Hyperlordosis: Treatment, Prevention, and More What’s hyperlordosis? Human spines are naturally curved, but too much curve can cause problems. Hyperlordosis is when the inward curve of the spine in your lower back is exaggerated. This condition is also called swayback or saddleback. Hyperlordosis can occur in all ages, but it’s rare in children. It’s a reversible condition. Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of hyperlordosis and how it’s treated. What are the symptoms of hyperlordosis? If you have hyperlordosis, the exaggerated curve of your spine will cause your stomach to thrust forward and your bottom to push out. From the side, the inward curve of your spine will look arched, like the letter C. You can see the arched C if you look at your profile in a full-length mirror. You may have lower back pain or neck pain, or restricted movement. There’s limited evidence connecting hyperlordosis to lower back pain, however. Most hyperlordosis is mild, and your back remains flexible. If the arch in your bac...
Back pain Prevention The majority of patients responding to basic extension and flexion principles of treatment have been educated in the means of achieving pain relief and restoring function. They have carried out the self-treatment procedures and have to a large extent become independent of therapists. Following successful treatment it requires little emphasis to convince patients that if they were able to reduce and abolish pain already present, it should also be possible to prevent the onset of any significant future low back pain. Of all the factors predisposing to low back pain only postural stresses can be easily influenced and fully controlled. We must develop this potential ingredient of prophylaxis to the full. The patient must understand that the risks of incurring low back pain are particularly great when the lumbar spine is held in sustained flexed positions; and that when the lordosis is reduced or eliminated for prolonged periods, he must at regular intervals and before the onset of p...
Deformities of the spine: Lordosis, Kyphosis, and Scoliosis ICD-9: 737.20 LORDOSIS ICD-9: 737.10 KYPHOSIS ICD-9: 737.30 SCOLIOSIS Video: How to Correct a Scoliosis With Exercise and Stretching Description ⚡ Lordosis ⚡ is an abnormal inward curvature of the lumbar or lower spine. This condition is commonly called “swayback.” Kyphosis is an abnormal outward curvature of the upper thoracic vertebrae. Commonly, this curvature is known as “humpback” or “round back.” Scoliosis is an abnormal sideward curvature of the spine to either the left or right. Some rotation of a portion of the vertebral column also may occur. Scoliosis often occurs in combination with kyphosis and lordosis. These three spinal deformities may affect children as well as adults. FIGURE. Spinal curvatures Etiology Lordosis, kyphosis, and scoliosis may be caused by a variety of problems, including congenital spinal defects, poor posture, a discrepancy in leg lengths (especially in scoliosis), and growth retardation or a vascular disturbance in the epiphysis of th...
TYPICAL TREATMENT PROGRESSION — THE DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME Day one Assessment and conclusion/diagnosis. Explanation of the cause of dysfunction and the treatment approach. Postural correction and instructions, especially regarding sitting; demonstrate the use of a lumbar support. Commence with exercises to recover function — that is, extension in lying, flexion in lying, or side gliding in standing, whatever procedure is indicated. Emphasise the need to experience some discomfort during the exercises, and the importance of frequent exercising during the day. If flexion in lying is recommended, we must warn to stop exercising if the symptoms quickly worsen. We may have overlooked derangement, or commenced the procedure too early following recent derangement. Always follow flexion exercises with some extension. Day two Confirm diagnosis. Check postural correction. Completely repeat'postural correction and instructions. Check exercises. If improving nothing should be changed. If not improving, ensure tha...