Spine Health. PROCEDURE 7 — EXTENSION MOBILISATION

The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient, crosses the arms and places the heels of the hands on the transverse processes of the appropriate lumbar segment. A gentle pressure is applied symmetrically and immediately released, but the hands must not lose contact. This is repeated rhythmically to the same segment about ten times. Each pressure is a little stronger than the previous one, depending on the patient’s tolerance and the behaviour of the pain. The procedure should be applied to the adjacent segments, one at a time, until all the areas affected have been mobilised.

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Fig. Positioning of hands prior to extension mobilisation. Extension mobilisation.

Effects:

In this procedure the external force applied by the therapist enhances the effects on derangement and dysfunction as described for the previous extension procedures.

In general, symmetrical pressures are used on patients with central and bilateral symptoms. Therapist-technique must be added when the patient is unable to reduce derangement or resolve dysfunction by the self-treatment procedures. That situation appears in derangement when instead of progressively lessening pain extension in lying (procedure 3) causes the same pain with each repetition. Under those circumstances extension mobilisation is indicated.

Spine Health. PROCEDURE 2 — LYING PRONE IN EXTENSION The patient, already lying prone, places the elbows under the shoulders and raises the top half of his body so that he comes to lean on elbows and forearms while pelvis and thighs remain on the couch. In this position the lumbar lordosis is automatically increased. Emphasis must be placed on allowing the low back to sag and the lordosis to increase. Fig. Lying prone in extension. Effects: Procedure 2 is a progression of procedure 1 and merely enhances its effects by increasing extension. Again, in derangement some time must be allowed to affect the contents of the disc and, if possible patients should remain in this position for five to ten minutes. In more acute patients sustained extension may not be well tolerated due to pain, and initially we must rely on the use of intermittent extension.
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 10 — ROTATION MANIPULATION IN EXTENSION The patient lies prone as for procedure 1. The therapist stands to one side of the patient and, having selected the correct segment, places the hands on either side of the spine as for the technique of rotation mobilisation in extension (procedure 9), which is always applied as a premanipulative testing procedure. The information obtained from the mobilisation is vital and determines on which side and in which direction the manipulation is to be performed. If following testing the manipulation is indicated, the therapist reinforces the one hand with the other on the appropriate transverse process. The manipulation is then performed as in procedure 8. Fig. Rotation manipulation in extension. Effects: The effects of the external force and the reasons for its use are the same as for procedure 9. When the desired result is not obtained with the mobilising technique, manipulation is indicated under certain circumstances. Regarding the direction in which the manipulation is to be...
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