TREATMENT OF SIDE GLIDING DYSFUNCTION — CORRECTION OF SECONDARY LATERAL SHIFT

Having observed thousands of lumbar spines it has become clear to me that asymmetry is the ‘norm’ and symmetry is almost atypical. Therefore, when examining dysfunction patients it is important to realise that many exhibit a minor scoliosis or lateral shift, the direction of which is sometimes extremely difficult to determine. With careful observation it can be seen that the top half of the patient’s body is not correctly related to the bottom half, and the patient has shifted laterally about the lumbar area. The anomalies include a number of lateral shifts now dysfunctional in character. These lateral shifts are referred to as secondary whereas those caused by derangement are primary.

READ:   Kyphosis: Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis

Fig. Recovery of loss of side gliding, leaching the procedure of self-correction of secondary lateral shift.

As discussed previously, we must determine whether the lateral shift is relevant to the present symptoms or is merely a congenital or developmental anomaly. If side gliding produces pain there is likely to be adaptive shortening within or about the disc and recovery of the side gliding movement must be attempted. As it is not easy to apply overpressure in the side gliding exercise, it may be difficult to recover this movement.

The patient must be fully instructed in self-correction of lateral shift (Proc. 17). He should perform the procedure ten times per day, at each session moving ten times into the overcorrected position. The last movement should be held firmly for about thirty to forty seconds. The patient should also be encouraged to stand in the overcorrected position whenever an opportunity arises during the day. If by the end of the first week pain produced by lateral shift correction is much less, the procedure will most likely have the desired result and must be continued for about three to four weeks in an attempt to restore full function. But if no change is evident after one week, there is little hope of improving this aspect of dysfunction.

READ:   Back Pain History
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 16 — CORRECTION OF LATERAL SHIFT This procedure has two parts: first the deformity in scoliosis is corrected; then, if present, the deformity in kyphosis is reduced and full extension is restored. The patient, standing with the feet about thirty centimeters apart, is asked to clearly define the areas where pain is being felt at present. The therapist stands on the side to which the patient is deviating and places the patient’s near elbow at a right angle by his side. The elbow will be used to increase the lateral pressure against the patient’s rib cage. The therapist’s arms encircle the patient’s trunk, clasping the hands about the rim of the pelvis. Now the therapist presses his shoulder against the patient’s elbow, pushing the patient’s rib cage, thoracic and upper lumbar spine away while at the same time drawing the patient’s pelvis towards himself. In this manner the deformity in scoliosis is reduced and, if possible slightly overcorrected. Initially, there will be significant resistance to the procedure, wh...
Kyphosis: Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis What Causes Kyphosis? Kyphosis, also known as roundback or hunchback, is a condition in which the spine in the upper back has an excessive curvature. The upper back, or thoracic region of the spine, is supposed to have a slight natural curve. The spine naturally curves in the neck, upper back, and lower back to help absorb shock and support the weight of the head. Kyphosis occurs when this natural arch is larger than normal. If you have kyphosis, you may have a visible hump on your upper back. From the side, your upper back may be noticeably rounded or protruding. In addition, people with hunchback appear to be slouching and have noticeable rounding of the shoulders. Kyphosis can lead to excess pressure on the spine, causing pain. It may also cause breathing difficulties due to pressure put on the lungs. Kyphosis in elderly women is known as dowager’s hump. Common causes of kyphosis Kyphosis can affect people of any age. It rarely occurs in newborns because it’s usually caused...
Hyperlordosis: Treatment, Prevention, and More What’s hyperlordosis? Human spines are naturally curved, but too much curve can cause problems. Hyperlordosis is when the inward curve of the spine in your lower back is exaggerated. This condition is also called swayback or saddleback. Hyperlordosis can occur in all ages, but it’s rare in children. It’s a reversible condition. Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of hyperlordosis and how it’s treated. What are the symptoms of hyperlordosis? If you have hyperlordosis, the exaggerated curve of your spine will cause your stomach to thrust forward and your bottom to push out. From the side, the inward curve of your spine will look arched, like the letter C. You can see the arched C if you look at your profile in a full-length mirror. You may have lower back pain or neck pain, or restricted movement. There’s limited evidence connecting hyperlordosis to lower back pain, however. Most hyperlordosis is mild, and your back remains flexible. If the arch in your bac...
Lordosis: Causes, Treatments, and Risks What is lordosis? Everyone’s spine curves a little in your neck, upper back, and lower back. These curves, which create your spine’s S shape, are called the lordotic (neck and lower back) and kyphotic (upper back). They help your body: absorb shock support the weight of the head align your head over your pelvis stabilize and maintain its structure move and bend flexibly Lordosis refers to your natural lordotic curve, which is normal. But if your curve arches too far inward, it’s called lordosis, or swayback. Lordosis can affect your lower back and neck. This can lead to excess pressure on the spine, causing pain and discomfort. It can affect your ability to move if it’s severe and left untreated. Treatment of lordosis depends on how serious the curve is and how you got lordosis. There’s little medical concern if your lower back curve reverses itself when you bend forward. You can probably manage your condition with physical therapy and daily exercises. But yo...
The Derangements and Their Treatment DERANGEMENT ONE Central or symmetrical pain across L4/5. Rarely buttock or thigh pain No deformity In Derangement One the disturbance within the disc is at a comparatively embryonic stage. Due to minor posterior migration of the nucleus and its invasion of a small radial fissure in the inner annulus, there is a minimal disturbance of disc material. This causes mechanical deformation of structures posteriorly within and about the disc, resulting in central or symmetrical low back pain. The accumulation of disc material also leads to a minor blockage in the affected joint preventing full extension, but the blockage is not enough to force the deformity of kyphosis upon the joint. In patients with Derangement One the history, symptoms and signs are usually typical of the syndrome, and the test movements confirm the diagnosis of derangement. Because the disturbance within the joint is relatively small it responds well to the patients’ own movements, and the majority of pati...