TYPICAL TREATMENT PROGRESSION — THE DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME

Day one

  • Assessment and conclusion/diagnosis.
  • Explanation of the cause of dysfunction and the treatment approach.
  • Postural correction and instructions, especially regarding sitting; demonstrate the use of a lumbar support.
  • Commence with exercises to recover function — that is, extension in lying, flexion in lying, or side gliding in standing, whatever procedure is indicated.
  • Emphasise the need to experience some discomfort during the exercises, and the importance of frequent exercising during the day.
  • If flexion in lying is recommended, we must warn to stop exercising if the symptoms quickly worsen. We may have overlooked derangement, or commenced the procedure too early following recent derangement.
  • Always follow flexion exercises with some extension.
READ:   The Postural Syndrome

Day two

  • Confirm diagnosis.
  • Check postural correction.
  • Completely repeat’postural correction and instructions.
  • Check exercises. If improving nothing should be changed.
  • If not improving, ensure that exercises are performed far enough into end range, maintained long enough during the last three repetitions, and performed often enough during the day.
  • Warn for ‘new pains’.

Day three

  • Check posture and exercises.
  • If no improvement, commence mobilisation procedures. Several mobilisation treatments may be required.
  • Patient must continue the self-treatment exercises as directed.

Day four and five

  • Check exercises and progress.
  • If in treatment for flexion dysfunction no further progress is possible with flexion in lying, change to flexion in standing, possibly flexion in step standing.
  • Take necessary precautions when starting flexion in standing.
  • Ensure that patient has ‘new pains’.
READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 9 — ROTATION MOBILISATION IN EXTENSION

Further treatments

  • I prefer to see patients in this category three or four days in succession. If progress is adequate and the patient understands the self-treatment
    programme, treatment may change to alternate days and later to twice per week if required.
  • It usually takes ten to twelve treatments, spread over four to six weeks, to successfully treat dysfunction.
  • If towards the middle of the treatment period the patient ceases to improve and especially if the remaining pain is unilateral, then a rotation manipulation may be required. This may have to be repeated two or three times and should be combined with mobilising and exercising procedures already being applied.
  • Before discharge prophylaxis must be discussed in detail.
READ:   Spine Health. PROCEDURE 8 — EXTENSION MANIPULATION
The Postural Syndrome DEFINITION I would define the postural syndrome as mechanical deformation of postural origin causing pain of a strictly intermittent nature, which appears when the soft tissues surrounding the lumbar segments are placed under prolonged stress. This occurs when a person performs activities which keep the lumbar spine in a relatively static position (as in vacuuming, gardening) or when they maintain end positions for any length of time (as in prolonged sitting). History Patients with postural pain are usually aged thirty or under. Frequently they have a sedentary occupation and in general they lack physical fitness. In addition to low back pain they often describe pains in the mid-thoracic and cervical areas. They state that the pain is produced by positions and not by movement, is intermittent and may sometimes disappear for two to three days at a time. It is often found that, when patients are more active at weekends — playing tennis and dancing — they have relatively little or no t...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 13 — FLEXION IN LYING The patient lies supine with the knees and hips flexed to about forty-five degrees and the feet flat on the couch. He bends the knees up towards the chest, firmly clasps the hands about them and applies overpressure to achieve maximum stress. The knees are then released and the feet placed back on the couch. The sequence is repeated about ten times. The first two or three flexion stresses are applied cautiously, but when the procedure is found to be safe the remaining pressures may become successively stronger, the last two or three being applied to the maximum possible. Fig. Flexion in lying. Effects: Flexion in lying causes a stretching of the posterior wall of the annulus, the posterior longitudinal ligament, the capsules of the facet joints, and other soft tissues. As the movement takes place from below upwards the lower lumbar and lumbo-sacral joints are placed on full stretch at the beginning of the exercise as soon as movement is initiated. Thus, the procedure is very i...
TREATMENT OF SIDE GLIDING DYSFUNCTION — CORRECTION OF SECONDARY LATERAL SHIFT Having observed thousands of lumbar spines it has become clear to me that asymmetry is the ‘norm’ and symmetry is almost atypical. Therefore, when examining dysfunction patients it is important to realise that many exhibit a minor scoliosis or lateral shift, the direction of which is sometimes extremely difficult to determine. With careful observation it can be seen that the top half of the patient’s body is not correctly related to the bottom half, and the patient has shifted laterally about the lumbar area. The anomalies include a number of lateral shifts now dysfunctional in character. These lateral shifts are referred to as secondary whereas those caused by derangement are primary. Fig. Recovery of loss of side gliding, leaching the procedure of self-correction of secondary lateral shift. As discussed previously, we must determine whether the lateral shift is relevant to the present symptoms or is merely a congenital or developmental anomaly. If side gliding produces pain the...
Hyperlordosis: Treatment, Prevention, and More What’s hyperlordosis? Human spines are naturally curved, but too much curve can cause problems. Hyperlordosis is when the inward curve of the spine in your lower back is exaggerated. This condition is also called swayback or saddleback. Hyperlordosis can occur in all ages, but it’s rare in children. It’s a reversible condition. Keep reading to learn about the symptoms and causes of hyperlordosis and how it’s treated. What are the symptoms of hyperlordosis? If you have hyperlordosis, the exaggerated curve of your spine will cause your stomach to thrust forward and your bottom to push out. From the side, the inward curve of your spine will look arched, like the letter C. You can see the arched C if you look at your profile in a full-length mirror. You may have lower back pain or neck pain, or restricted movement. There’s limited evidence connecting hyperlordosis to lower back pain, however. Most hyperlordosis is mild, and your back remains flexible. If the arch in your bac...
Spine Health. PROCEDURE 6 — EXTENSION IN STANDING The patient stands with the feet well apart and places the hands (fingers pointing backwards) in the small of the back across the belt line. He leans backwards as far as possible, using the hands as a fulcrum, and then returns to neutral standing. The exercise is repeated about ten times. As with extension in lying it is necessary to move to the very maximum to obtain the desired result. Fig. Extension in standing. Effects: Extension in standing produces similar effects on derangement and dysfunction as extension in lying, but it is less effective in the earlier treatment stages of both syndromes. Whenever extension in lying is prevented by circumstances, an extension stress can be given by extension in standing. In derangement, extension in standing is designed to reduce accumulation of nuclear material in the posterior compartment of the intervertebral joint, provided this accumulation is not gross. In the latter case extension in lying will have to be performed first. Th...